The History of British Tea in America

//The History of British Tea in America

The History of British Tea in America

British Tea in America

While Americans may technically count themselves as “tea drinkers” it is important to remember that this trend of tea drinking (like many things) came from England. British Tea in America is still quite popular, but it is important to look back on the history of British tea in the US and how Americans came to have a love for British tea.

Tea in England

It was actually trade with China that first started bringing popular teas to Britain. But there are many who believe it was actually the action of one very powerful woman that really made tea drinking so popular.

In fact, many people believe that in the 1600s when King Charles II married the Portuguese princess Catherine of Braganza is when tea drinking first became popular among British aristocrats. Everyone was paying close attention to what the steroidsclub.net new queen was doing and one of her sterobody.com favorite activities was to drink tea regularly.

While tea quickly astralean became a big trend in England site, it didn’t take off quite as fast when it was first introduced in the United States.

The Journey of British Tea in America

In the 17th century, Dutch buy oral steroids settlers from New Amsterdam brought the first tea to America. However, while these settlers thought their beloved tradition would take off in the new world—it wasn’t exactly a major hit. Many “new Americans” were unfamiliar with tea leaves and many people didn’t like the brown color or how long it took to brew the leaves.

In fact, many people initially tried to cook tea leaves as you would spinach, in an effort to enjoy the leaf faster, without all of the fuss associated with brewing.

Eventually, like many British customs, tea drinking started to take off in the colonies. In fact, tea became so popular in America (where smuggling was quite common) that tea became one of the most coveted products on the list of illegal goods.

By the 18th century the art of tea drinking finally started to take off, and green tea was the most commonly consumed tea in the United States. Eventually, when the tea tax was placed on teas coming from Britain, it caused an uproar in the United States and eventually lead to the Boston Tea Party and eventually the American Revolution.

Yes, tea was that popular in the United States, that it lead to one of the biggest wars in the history of the world. It is also what caused many Americans to lean more towards coffee drinking at the time.

Tea was not only a popular beverage in American homes and a tradition that had great ties to British history, but tea was something that helped build America’s industry. Merchants who brought tea over directly from China for trade, became some of the first early American millionaires.

Eventually it would be Americans who would event the first tea bag.

America’s Take on British Tea

While Americans put up a great deal of fight to get their tea, it doesn’t mean that they didn’t put their own spin on the popular beverage. While tea is not as popular as it is in Britain, it still has an important part in American culture.

Tea in the United States is not as much of an event as it is in Britain. While both countries primarily prefer premium black tea, Americans are much more likely to take their tea iced. Around 80% of the tea drank in the United States is iced, while a majority of tea in Britain is served hot.

Americans also came up with their own take on tea with their “sweet tea,” a popular staple in southern states. It is a very popular treat in America, but something most people in England haven’t bothered to try.

Simply put, there isn’t as much culture surrounding the consumption of tea in America, like there is in England. While some hotels may offer high-tea mostly as a novelty, afternoon tea is not a common practice in the United States. In the US, tea is just another one of the many beverages that people consume, much like juices or sodas.

While tea continues to not only be a popular drink but a popular activity in Britain, Americans haven’t adopted the art of “having tea” with friends or family—which is fine. Americans have put enough effort into adopting our tea over the year, that we prefer to keep this tradition to ourselves.

By | 2020-02-24T07:56:53+00:00 November 25th, 2019|tea|0 Comments

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